Category: Anthem Vault Info

Interview with Anthem Hayek Blanchard on AnthemGold

What is AnthemGold?AnthemGoldLogo

AnthemGold is a cryptocurrency company focused primarily on making gold easy to own and, ultimately, to become a preferred currency. Each ANTHEM (AGLD) is backed by one gram of physical gold, securely vaulted with a nonbank operator and fully insured.

But looking at the bigger picture, our goal is to bring gold and cryptocurrency together to create the world’s most stable form of money… to become a Gold Standard, if you will, in verifying supply chain management when it comes to the transfer and storage of physical, fungible items of value such as precious metals.

Do you see AnthemGold as a service to be primarily used by people to transact in gold, or as a way for people to easily buy gold as a store of wealth?

Ultimately, I think it will be more of the latter – storing gold as a form of wealth – but I believe the reason people will want to buy our form, AnthemGold, is that it will be a superior way of owning gold, allowing digital transferability via peer-to-peer, decentralized networks.

How does an AnthemGold transaction compare to a traditional bank transaction?

A transaction using AnthemGold can be performed for mere cents and executed in seconds, compared to significant dollars and several days of delay for traditional bank transactions. For example, I recently sent several thousand dollars via the traditional banking system. It cost over a hundred dollars in fees and it took several days.

In stark contrast to a bank, AnthemGold provides a fully gold-backed cryptocurrency that is transferable across the Ethereum global computer network. The one gram of physical gold that backs each ANTHEM is securely vaulted at a nonbank vault and is also fully insured. What this means is that not only is each ANTHEM fully backed with gold – the world’s ultimate store of value for 5,000 years – but they are also fully protected from confiscation and from company failure.   

What are the implications of AnthemGold for the banking industry?

The current state of affairs in banking is bizarre due to excessive government control,  regulations and compliance. When you look at the countless hours that financial service companies spend on compliance, it is absurd, and it is getting worse. People who work in financial service companies will confirm this. For example, I know an investment banker who spent the first 7 months of his first job learning all the compliance rules, instead of focusing on strategies to build wealth and value for the company’s clients.

Unfortunately this is the reality, but it is something people don’t understand when they look at cryptocurrencies and marvel at how they are gaining in value. If you add up the cost of banking fees and calculate all the time wasted waiting for bank transactions and banks following compliance rules, then you begin to see the value of a decentralized and low-cost cryptocurrency. Sadly, we have become used to the current archaic government-controlled system, thinking it normal that every bank is directed and constrained by an increasingly authoritarian centralized system.

45 minutes is the average time I have to spend, when I am dealing with a bank, and I probably interact with a bank or financial service institution 25 to 30 times a year. So when you add this up, I am wasting two waking days of my life each year.

But a decentralized cryptocurrency like AnthemGold’s eliminates the need for a lot of this wasteful and time-consuming management. A cryptocurrency is so much more efficient than the current hierarchical structure. It is comparable to what innovative tech companies have done to disrupt their industries with decentralization. Think of Airbnb and Uber.

What could a decentralized cryptocurrency like AnthemGold mean for the future of banking and financial services?

Ethereum cripto currency vector logoThe current model means that almost all payment systems must clear through the centralized banking system. Banks have this special privilege for a host of reasons such as legal tender laws, bank charter laws, the Fed wire system, etc.

Fast forward to the present, and there is no denying that we are well into the digital age, and are now at the dawn of the decentralized age. Bitcoin made it possible for trust to be established in a decentralized world, and that very innovation itself has allowed us to look beyond the current Bitcoin model.

The future is in decentralization and voluntary groups, rather than involuntary compliance and a dominant centralized system. This has major implications. For example, a government today can put a lien or a freeze on an account, but in a decentralized world this couldn’t happen. It completely changes the relationships, enhancing trust, efficiency and security. In short, it changes the whole nature of the game.

Banks traditionally make money through payment services and lending, supported by protectionist government regulations that make it extremely difficult, even impossible, for any other business to duplicate a bank’s services. But although the payment system is still largely controlled by the banks, cryptocurrencies are now offering another option. Once cryptocurrencies start taking the payment business away from banks, the only big advantage that banks will have is their ability to supply credit and their access to tap into the government to monetize debt.

What is the potential market for cryptocurrencies?

The amount of gold above ground is estimated to be around $7 trillion in value, whereas Bitcoin, currently the largest cryptocurrency, is only $30 billion. So it is still early in the day, and there is so much opportunity facing us. There is easily 100x left in the space, maybe even 300x or 400x. In ten years time, the cryptocurrency market could easily be worth a trillion dollars.

Look at it another way. The gold market trades at around $22 trillion a year, which is more than the Dow Jones Industrial Index, the S&P 500 and most of the world’s currencies combined.

What are the implications of negative interest rates on cryptocurrencies?

A great question. Not only do the numbers support the market potential for cryptocurrencies, but the reasoning is there as well in our current environment of negative interest rates. As banks continue to pump out easy money and credit, this creates the demand for more cryptocurrencies because people want a currency that is not continually being debased. So it’s a feedback loop.

Once interest rates go meaningfully below zero, then it is cheaper to keep cash in a vault than to hold cash as excess funds at the central bank. The question then becomes, “How much does the central bank trust the commercial banks?” The central bank might start to enforce penalties for keeping cash reserves in a bank vault rather than with the central bank. As you can imagine, once the central bank starts to demand this cash, the system will start to fall apart. Quickly.

Another way to address this is to limit or even ban cash, a trend we are seeing in other countries. As long as governments can force central banks and financial institutions to hold cash on their ledgers, they can easily apply negative interest rates or taxes. Correct?

Exactly. That’s a big part of it. Restricting or banning cash puts more money into the banking system, to create higher excess reserves.

Many people, especially Americans, are accustomed to pricing everything in U.S. Dollars, seeing the dollar as a reliable measuring stick for valuing goods and services. But where or when do you see the tipping point when people wake up and realize that the dollar – and other fiat currencies – are not the ultimate measuring stick and that alternatives do exist?

When you look at places like Venezuela or Ukraine, the people have already woken up. In Venezuela, you hear of people setting up Bitcoin mining equipment and having to transact in Bitcoin because there is no other way to exchange goods and services, except for simple barter. Ukraine has a lot of Bitcoin activity, even a network of Bitcoin ATMs, which is fascinating given that Ukraine is a relatively undeveloped country, still struggling to break free from the crippling institutions of the Soviet era.

Cryptocurrencies make good sense when you understand how they allow people to transact globally, securely, at high speed and with low costs, and to hold assets safely and independent of government interference.

Since AnthemGold is backed by gold, do you expect the price of ANTHEMs to be more stable than other cryptocurrencies, and do you expect them to track the price of gold?

Yes and Yes. We expect ANTHEMs to track the price of gold, similar to how a one gram ingot tracks the price of gold, with a small premium being attached to it due to its form factor. For example, a one gram ingot would have more utility than a one kilogram bar because it is easier to spend a one gram ingot, due to its small size and divisibility.

What do you hope to achieve with AnthemGold?Virtual Currency Icons Set Flat Style

My hope, and our team’s goal, is to play a material part in protecting people’s wealth and their individual store of value and in particular, guarding against a scenario of civil unrest, such as will occur if inflation takes off. We hope to do this by building up the cryptocurrency infrastructure as quickly as we possibly can. At the end of the day – and without wishing to sound dramatic here – this is a matter of survival because human beings must have ways to transact. But this is still very early days, and the coding language needs to be further developed. After all, Bitcoin is not even ten years old. Like anything in our developing world, it takes a while for technology to advance and then for people to adopt something new until it soon becomes quite commonplace.

Is there anything else you can add?

A brief history lesson, if I may, but an important one concerning gold and the future of money.

My entire career has been spent in the precious metals business, and my father, James U. Blanchard III, spearheaded the movement for Americans to legally own gold once again, a right we lost in 1933 and thankfully regained in 1975, in large part due to my father’s incessant lobbying for legalization.

My parents created James U. Blanchard & Company in 1975, a precious metals and rare coin company that at one time was the world’s largest. Following in their footsteps, even my own three names reflect my aspirations and my heartfelt mission: Anthem (the freedom-seeking hero of Ayn Rand’s novella), Hayek (the Nobel prize-winning economist and philosopher Friedrich Hayek) and Blanchard (continuing the family tradition).  

In conclusion, the coming marriage of gold and cryptocurrency is my heritage, my expertise, my vision and my passion, and it is something that I take very seriously. AnthemGold’s experienced team has created an innovative gold-backed cryptocurrency that simply and securely allows you to acquire, store and spend gold worldwide, with silver and other precious metals soon to be added. This, if I may be so bold, is the future of money.

Where can people find out more about AnthemGold?

One of the best places to go is our AnthemGold page on BnkToTheFuture.com an online investment platform.

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This Time, it IS Different

This Time it IS Different

It's Different

It IS Different

The four most dangerous words in the world of finance, often repeated, are “This time it’s different.” During both of the last two major booms and busts, a common belief was that the new internet age was different (2000) and later, that housing was also different (2008).

However, used to describe our current interest rate environment (particularly negative interest rates), the over-worked phrase actually does ring true.

Financial journalist and observer Jim Grant noted at a recent investment conference that research on interest rates shows that over the past 5,000 years of history, there has never been an instance of negative interest rates… until now.

The ever quick-witted Grant remarked, “If these are the first sub-zero interest rates in 5,000 years, is this not the worst economy since 3,000 B.C.?” Perhaps. Or maybe this is just the first time in history where we have central banks active in monetary policy, attempting to drive interest rates as low as possible.

Record Negative-Yield Debt

The current amount of debt sporting a negative yield continues to grow. In early 2016, there was over $5 trillion in negative yielding debt. This grew to nearly $12 trillion by the end of June, and it is now closer to $13.4 trillion!

Not only has more debt become negative in yield, but it is increasingly happening to longer term debt. Yields on 10-year government bonds have become negative for Germany, Switzerland and Japan.  

Remember that bond yields are an inverse to bond prices. As bond prices get bid up, their yields go down.

What makes this unique is that bonds are a relatively simple financial instrument. Bonds do not have the subjective valuation that applies to stocks, and this makes the math and the logic of bonds fairly straightforward.

A person can buy a stock from another person while thinking it still has the potential to go higher, given higher growth prospects for the company. The price is based on one person’s subjective valuation.

On the other hand, bonds are not as subjective. If you buy a bond at a certain price, with a certain coupon payment, then the yield is a mathematical certainty. It is the yield you will receive per year if you hold the bond to maturity, and if it pays the principal in full without defaulting.

What Bond Buyers are Saying

By stark contrast, today’s current bond buyers are purchasing a security where they know they will lose money if it is held to maturity. For example, if you buy a bond today with a negative 0.5% yield, and it has five years until maturity, then after five years, you will be paid back less than what you originally paid for the bond. Even with the coupon payments you received during the life of the bond, the total payout will be equivalent to getting a minus 0.5% return on your money.

Therefore, we must make one of two different assumptions about current buyers of negative yielding debt. One assumption is they could be anticipating the bonds will continue to go up in price and that they will then sell them for a profit. In other words, the negative yields will become even more negative, and they will sell the bonds before maturity.

Unfortunately, this requires the buyer to believe there will always be a ‘greater fool’ out there who is willing to accept a higher price than what the original buyer paid. It it not unlike those who bought houses before 2007 on the premise they would flip them to a higher bidder. Remember that with bonds, someone must be holding these financial instruments at all times.  

The second assumption is that buyers are perfectly fine accepting a negative yield, and are willing to ‘pay for the privilege’ of lending out their money. This goes against all basic laws of finance. It only makes sense insofar as these buyers have no other place to put their money, and are therefore choosing the lesser evil.

But this is a weak explanation, because they could put their money in cash and get at least a zero percent return. Also, this doesn’t seem to make sense for longer maturity debt, as it means these buyers think negative interest rates are here to stay for at least ten years or more.

Both of these scenarios point out how this time, it is very different, and we are living in a twisted financial world, a world only exists because of the manipulations and distortions of central banks.

It is always precarious to try to make predictions, but it seems that there will come a time in the not too distant future when people will look back at this period and say “What were people thinking?”Secure Your Wealth

Like a frog languishing in a slowly heating pot of water, investors have warmed up to the environment of negative interest rates, not realizing how absurd and dangerous the situation has become. But take time now to assess, and be well prepared for the inevitable.

In this zero/negative interest rate environment, it is stunning to consider that since 2000, the DJIA (Dow Jones Industrial Average) has increased in value 63% while silver has increased in value 289% and gold has increased 380%…. an annualized return of 23.75%!

Cash, anyone? Or gold!

Brexit Fears Fade, But Gold Does Not

british gold reservesSome of the dust is starting to settle from the Brexit vote when British citizens surprised the world by voting to exit the European Union. The initial uncertainty caused stocks to sell off sharply and the British pound to plummet while gold rose in price.

Stock markets in the United States have now largely rebounded as fears have subsided, but instead of similarly reversing course, gold has stayed high and has even pushed higher. This recent market action highlights the fragility of political constructs, while underscoring the fact that gold does not depend on such political alliances.

United Kingdom withdrawal from the European UnionWhy Brexit Is A Big Deal

In a sense, Britain’s decision to leave the European Union is not such a major disruption. After all, Britain was never part of the Euro currency, so there will be no changes to its currency system. Further, the process will take at least two years or more while the terms are negotiated; - plenty of time for British citizens and the markets to adjust and plan ahead for any changes.

Yet in another way, it is a very big deal. First, it is an important event because Britain is the first nation to exit the relatively youthful European Union. Imagine if a state of the United States were to exit the union. The first U.S. state to leave would constitute a landmark historical event, even if it was a state that has talked about wanting to exit for a while (I’m looking at you, Texas).

Once one nation has shown that it is possible to leave with a peaceful vote, many other E.U. citizens may want to follow suit. This would be especially powerful if it were a country that was not only part of the Euro currency, but one that was financially healthy, such as Germany.

Britain exiting the European Union and sending the markets into turmoil shows the fragility of political institutions and the tenuous nature of alliances made between high-level politicians and political bodies.

There is nothing inherently strong about such alliances because these agreements depend on the word and bond of each country, backed up by the contracts they each sign. These in turn are only as good as the rule of law governing them, which is also a political arrangement.

Government Currencies Are Mere Political Promises

The Brexit vote gave citizens and investors around the world a harsh wake-up call, reminding them that entities like political unions and countries are merely political constructs, devised by politicians.

While these political institutions can be helpful, citizens can also come to feel they are doing more harm than good, and once they recognize this, they may choose to reject them.

Currencies are no different. There is nothing inherently stable about today’s government fiat currencies, because there is nothing backing them beyond the faith, credit and political promises behind those flimsy pieces of paper.

A national currency – or a multi-national currency like the Euro – may provide some benefit to citizens in terms of facilitating trade. But if citizens begin to perceive that the costs of the political monetary system (such as inflation or value instability) start to outweigh the benefits, they will reject them and look for a better alternative.   Composition with 50 gram gold bar, banknotes and coins

Fortunately, gold is an alternative currency to which one can turn. Rather than a metallic commodity, gold should really be considered as another currency or form of money, but with one major difference: it does not depend on political constructs, promises, or faith in a political system in order to work as a currency.

In fact, gold usually functions as the exact opposite, representing a loss of faith in central banks and governments. This is why it is essential to hold a portion of your wealth and investment portfolio in physical gold.

Here at Anthem Vault, we offer solutions to easily acquire and own physical gold, the best way to quickly and securely diversify a portfolio. We believe a reasonable allocation to gold is 10-20% of your investment portfolio, depending on your level of risk acceptance and other factors. Contrary to the opinion of some, and in-line with historical data and modern portfolio theory, this allocation can greatly lower your portfolio’s risk without sacrificing returns.

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Gold’s Role In Today’s Modern Investment Portfolio

What Role Should Gold Play In Today’s Portfolios?

To some people, suggesting that gold should be part of a balanced investment portfolio is like suggesting leeches are a way to cure ailments. Many investment advisors consider gold to Investment Managementbe a ‘barbarous relic’ that has no place in today’s modern portfolio, given our current financial innovations and instruments.

Yet when examined carefully, it is clear that gold is another asset that has the potential to add non-correlated returns to a portfolio. In this manner, it actually fits very well with modern portfolio theory, and gold should be incorporated by all investors and responsible financial advisors.

Why gold gets a bad rap as an investment

One of the biggest misunderstandings about gold as an investment is an unfair comparison to other financial assets. Gold is not an ‘investment’ in the sense that it brings the expectation of a positive return or cash flow, like stocks or bonds that pay interest or dividends.

An ounce of gold in your portfolio today will be an ounce of gold 100 years from now. It will not magically grow, expand or compound. It will not pay anything in return, and will likely cost a very small amount in storage fees or insurance. This is why gold is sometimes referred to as a non-productive financial asset.

As a financial asset, it is also criticized as something that only keeps up with inflation over the long-term, usually underperforming stocks and bonds, while exhibiting price volatility. But this is unfair and a misrepresentation of the essence of gold and the purpose it serves in a portfolio. Gold should never be considered as a stand-alone investment, but always as a part of a portfolio.

How to evaluate gold

Gold EvaluationThe main function of gold is to protect purchasing power, both locally in terms of inflation as well as globally in terms of currency fluctuations, and to mitigate risk. Gold performs well in times of stress or domestic/international crisis, as well as serving as one of the most liquid of all assets and commodities.

In other words, it doesn’t make sense to evaluate something based on criteria that do not apply. After all, you wouldn’t evaluate a bus by how fast it can go and then compare it to a Ferrari. A bus is not designed for speed and high performance, but for transporting a large number of people.

Similarly, some people inappropriately evaluate the nominal returns on gold and compare this to the performance of stocks. But the purpose of holding gold is not capital appreciation, but capital preservation.

Those familiar with modern portfolio theory understand that the holy grail of investing and asset allocation is to obtain more return and less risk. An asset will be added to a portfolio if it can significantly reduce risk without giving up much in terms of return. This is akin to the concept of correlation, or how much two assets move together: either in step with each other (correlated) or out of step (non-correlated).

Physical gold has either very low correlation or even negative correlation to almost all other asset classes, including stocks, bonds, cash, real estate and even other commodities. Therefore, even though gold can be quite volatile in price, those swings are usually going the opposite way of other major asset classes like stocks.

Therefore since gold is such a good diversifier, reducing risk without giving up much reward, the question is: how much of your portfolio should be in gold?Gold Investment

In a white paper, Merk Investments ran a few portfolio simulations that reverse-engineered the proper amount of gold. In other words, the study found what percentage of a portfolio should be invested in physical gold in order to achieve the highest return for a given amount of risk, something financial practitioners refer to as the efficient frontier.

The study found that from 1971 through February of 2014, a whopping 29% allocation to gold would have achieved the best risk-reward profile for a portfolio, compared to 100% in stocks; this, despite gold being more volatile than stocks during this period.

To be clear, the study does not state this as investment advice; it is simply finding the percentage number that fits the historical data. However, the study clearly drives home the point that a surprisingly high percentage allocation to physical gold would actually improve the risk-reward balance of a portfolio.

Of course, portfolios are not merely divided between stocks and gold. Other non-correlated assets can also be added, such as real estate or other commodities. Previous studies over the years have found that a 5-15% allocation to physical gold is therefore reasonable.

Here at Anthem Vault, we believe a reasonable allocation to gold is 10-20% of your investment portfolio, depending on your level of risk acceptance and other factors. Contrary to the opinion of some, and in-line with historical data and modern portfolio theory, this allocation can greatly lower your portfolio’s risk without sacrificing returns.

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Only Gold Lowers Risk, Compared To All Other Financial Assets

risk concept in clamp

Gold clamps credit and counterparty risk down to zero!

When reviewing the benefits of owning gold, one of the factors consistently at the forefront is the fact that gold has no counterparty risk. Counterparty risk is the risk incurred by having one or more other entities (counterparties) involved in a party’s transaction, such that they may be unable to fulfil their financial obligations to the party.

In fact, gold is risk-free in terms of credit and counterparty risk. It’s a concept that is thrown around a lot in the gold community, but few actually know what it means. Although it seems obvious once you understand it, the implications are very serious. Let’s first look at counterparty risk as it relates to gold because this is the most simple example, and then we will compare this to other asset classes or forms of financial wealth.

Gold is… well, Gold!

Gold bars

Gold is the only financial asset with no counterparty or credit risk

Gold is a very dense precious metal that has a physical composition that makes it ‘gold’. If you own an ounce of gold, it is yours, just like you own a pencil. Once you own a piece of gold, nobody else has a claim on it. You probably traded something for it, or bought it with cash. But once you own it, that person with whom you traded no longer owns the gold, has control over it, and will likely forget about it.

This of course may seem all too obvious, but the power of this simple observation will become clear as we compare gold to other financial assets.

EVERY Other Financial Asset Class Has A Counterparty

For example, consider corporate bonds. If you purchase a bond from a company, you own that bond and have rights to it. However, that bond is not just recorded on your personal balance sheet as an asset, it is also concurrently on the balance sheet of the company that issued it, and it is recorded as a liability on their books.

A holder of a bond is not just an owner of the bond, but has entered into a contractual agreement with the bond issuer. Counterparty risk is the risk that the entity on the other side of the contract will not fulfill their obligations; in this case, the risk that they will not repay the bond when it is due or make the required interest payments to you, the holder.

What about government bonds, which are considered risk-free? Government bonds are usually considered risk-free because governments have the power to tax their citizens to make their bond payment obligations. Unfortunately, there are limits to this, just ask Puerto Rico.

Governments that control their own money supply are considered to be even safer, because they can just print money to cover any bond repayment shortfalls. Yet this does not remove the counterparty risk. Holders of bonds will be repaid, but Out Of Stockwith devalued currency.

What about money in banks, such as simple checking and savings accounts? Surely there is no counterparty risk here, as the money is there to be withdrawn at any time, right?

Money deposited in a bank is an asset on your personal balance sheet. But for the bank, it is recorded as a liability, because the bank must be ready to redeem any request for that money, at any time you want to withdraw it.

When a large number of customers want to withdraw their money simultaneously – known as a bank run and usually the result of panic – the bank’s reserves may not be able to cover the withdrawal amounts and the depositors’ money is at risk. Yes, there is FDIC insurance, but this is just another counterparty, and the FDIC in turn receives its money from the U.S. Treasury: another counterparty to add to the list. Furthermore, ask anyone in Cyprus who experienced a ‘bail-in’ if they still believe their deposits are completely safe in a bank!

Finally, what about cold hard cash, withdrawn and stuffed under a mattress? Isn’t this exactly the same as storing an ounce of gold? No. The Federal Reserve issues those notes, hence the words Federal Reserve Note at the top of each the bill. Therefore, the Federal Reserve Notes that are outstanding and in circulation are a line item recorded on the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet as a liability.

Since you cannot redeem a dollar for anything but another dollar, the counterparty risk is that the currency may fail completely or at least be devalued, something we have certainly witnessed consistently over the past hundred years.

Many people believe gold is a very risky financial asset when compared to traditional vehicles like stocks, bonds, savings accounts and even physical cash. Yet all of these possess counterparty risk, while outright ownership of gold has absolutely no counterparty risk. If protection against turbulent financial conditions is one of your goals, gold is the only financial asset in your portfolio that will not carry this very real and significant risk. 

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Florentine Florin: A Symbolic Reminder of Gold’s Global Appeal

Since the dawn of civilization, precious meals like gold and silver
Statue of Michelangelo's David in front of the Palazzo Vecchiohave been used for currency and wealth accumulation, starting with the first coin dating back to around 550 BC.

Italy’s Florence has a storied history concerning money and coinage which spans thousands of years, a trend which started in 1252 with the creation of the Florentine florin (3.5 grams and 54 grains of fine gold), this being the first European gold coin minted in sufficient quantities for European commerce since the 7th Century.

With its name of fleur-de-lys deriving from the flowering iris – the badge of Florence – the florin was destined to make a mark on the international currency market, since many Florentine banks had European branches. Its staying power as a dominant currency of commerce was tied to the outgrowth of the Florentine economy and its major stakeholders, which included money-changers, silk manufacturers, furriers and guilds.

Gold Florin, FlorenceThe weight of the original 1252 florin equaled the value of one lira in the local Florentine money. Interestingly, while the florin’s gold content stayed the same, the lira experienced such inflation that by 1500, the value of one florin was seven lira.

The florin did experience competition from European rivals in terms of its economic presence. Although their coins never attained the success of the florin, the Italian city of Genoa – its most prominent competitor – also began gold coinage in 1252.

The florin’s ascendancy led to wide acceptance across Europe, serving as an engine for international commerce throughout the continent. Its role at the time in fostering global economic growth held great significance; a level of status that no doubt led to its mention in Dante’s Divine Comedy, a perennial classic that was completed in 1320.

In recognition of its growing prominence, the British government released a 2-shilling version of the florin in 1849, valued at 1/10th of a Pound Sterling. This coin remained in circulation in the British currency system until the country’s foray into decimalization in 1971. Additionally, the Dutch florin – known as the guilder – endured until The Netherland’s currency disappeared in 2002 with the advent the Euro. This signaled the end of the florin’s long and illustrious reign as the world’s practical ‘gold standard’ of currency.

Nevertheless, the florin’s endurance throughout the ages is a symbolic reminder of gold’s continuing global appeal and its impact on world economies. 

At Anthem Vault, we have long championed the spirit and staying-power of gold, ensuing from legacy currencies like the florin. Over time, gold has continually demonstrated its dominance as a transactional asset that protects and enhances wealth. This track record underscores our commitment to making gold an easy-to-buy, safe, secure and affordable element of your savings, investment and wealth-protection strategy for you, your family and for future generations.  

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