Freedom & Opportunity

DontTreadOnMeFlagHaving just celebrated our own independence and freedom on July Fourth, recent events in Egypt provoke questions about the stability and longevity of our own democracy.

Q. In an era when social media can motivate millions overnight, at what point do tens of millions of demonstrators, protesting on the streets against the status quo, gain the moral authority over a democratically elected but increasingly onerous and misdirected government?

Q. In a nation with ever-evolving restrictions on private gun ownership, can we rely on the armed forces to recognize such a turning point in the tide of populist protest, reassuring ourselves that the armed forces will always side with the masses and eject a despotic leadership?

Q. As believers in democracy, should we meekly accept the ascendancy of a  disastrous or reprehensible political philosophy, simply because they won a majority at the ballot box?

In America, we believe we are not susceptible to widespread social unrest and are perhaps immune to revolution; after all, we already had our American Revolution.

TRUTH ABOUT FREEDOMEgyptFlag

But compare three different situations, with disturbingly common threads: The American Revolution (‘REV‘), the current situation in Egypt (‘EGP‘), and the current circumstances today in the U.S. (‘USA‘):

REV: The British thought the colonies should be utilized in ways that best suited the Crown and Parliament. EGP: Mubarak, and then Morsi, thought that Egypt should be governed in ways that best suited the leaders in government. USA: The ever-expanding Fed thinks that government should serve the best interests of government and the administration’s favored few: federal workers, trade unions, political supporters, etc.

REV: Increasing disagreement over the way Britain treated the 13 colonies, versus the way the colonies thought they should be treated. EGP: Increasing disagreement over the way the government treats the people, versus the way the people think they should be treated. USA: Increasing disagreement over the way the government treats the people, versus the way the people think they should be treated.

REV: A rallying cry of the revolution was ‘No taxation without representation’, combined with the common sentiment that the people were taxed too greatly. EGP: Egyptians feel they are over-taxed and over-regulated to the point of deterring business opportunities and entrepreneurship. USA: A majority of Americans has lost faith in the IRS, believing the tax code should be simplified and made fair or flat, a concept with which the administration disagrees.

USFlagREV: The colonists had a strong streak of independence and a desire for greater opportunities and more freedom. EGP: The Egyptian people demonstrated a desire to break away from authoritarian rule, to have more religious freedom and to have the chance at a better life. USA: An increasing number of Americans believe in limited government, but we have an expanding Fed and live in an over-regulated, overly politically correct, over-taxed, nanny state that spends money on wasteful projects like a drunken sailor and increasingly infringes on individual freedoms, business enterprise and property rights.

REV: The people’s desire for economic freedom and opportunity, unburdened by government. EGP: The people’s desire for economic freedom and opportunity, unburdened by government. USA: The people’s desire for economic freedom and opportunity, unburdened by government.

REV: Colonial legislatures had developed a measure of independence from the Crown and were used to operating at the local level, a practice the Crown sought to diminish. EGP: Religious organizations had evolved a system of mutual cooperation and respect, even though Islam is the dominant religion, a tolerance that Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood sought to curtail with the imposition of Sharia laws. USA: States have exercised their rights in ways that have brought them into conflict with a Fed that increasingly seeks to bully and interfere with States’ rights.

REV: A government out of touch with the people, not representing the will of the people. EGP: A government out of touch with the people, not representing the will of the people. USA: A government out of touch with the people, not representing the will of the people.

REV: A government trying to confiscate the arms of the people, to prevent the people’s militia resisting despotic government. EGP: A government that had already banned gun ownership – the sine qua non for authoritarian regimes – to prevent the people’s resistance to despotic government. USA: A government that constantly tries to restrict or ban private gun ownership, an approach successfully used countless times throughout history to pave the way for authoritarian rule.

REV: The British Currency Acts (1751 & 1764) restricted the colonies’ issuance of paper currency and then outlawed the use of paper money to settle public and private debts. EGP: Egypt’s foreign currency reserves have been halved, causing the Egyptian Pound to plummet in value. USA: The Fed is printing $85 billion a month, devaluing the fiat currency and turning the U.S. Dollar into the U.S. Dullard. Meanwhile, gold and silver – the only true money – are denied the status of legal tender.

FREEDOM – ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY – SOUND MONEYGoldDollar

It is safe to say that the Founding Fathers would be horrified by the State Of The Nation today: a worthless fiat currency, a trampled Constitution, a Leviathan government and a populace increasingly dependent on Federal handouts. In the words of George Washington, “Government is not reason; it is not eloquent; it is force. Like fire, it is a dangerous servant and a fearful master.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestRedditShare