Harriet Tubman: New Face of the $20 Bill?

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The abolitionist Harriet Tubman has long been admired for her civil rights legacy. And if a grassroots organization has its way, she will one day adorn the front of a $20 bill.

The group, Women On 20s, recently asked the public to vote to get Tubman on U.S. printed currency. She garnered nearly 34% of the vote, edging out former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt for the distinction of replacing Andrew Jackson. If this is codified by the Department of Treasury, Tubman would make history as the first woman and the first African-American to be represented on American paper currency.

A little history about Tubman. She was arguably the most influential figure in the Underground Railroad Movement, a network of routes that facilitated slaves fleeing to northern free states as well as Canada. Tubman, who herself escaped slavery in Maryland, made it her personal cause to free hundreds of slaves out of bondage. In addition to her work to free slaves, she was a passionate advocate for women’s equality and suffrage.

As she noted about her abolitionist work, “I was a conductor on the Underground Railroad, never running my train off the track and never losing a passenger.”

This campaign to highlight women via U.S. paper currency has gained a ton of political support, including U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-New Hampshire), from a state that has a prominent history in the freedom movement. Women on 20s has delivered a petition to President Obama, asking him to instruct Treasury Secretary Lew to circulate these bills in anticipation of the women’s suffrage centennial in 2020. This will be an unprecedented move if executed; one with rich historical significance for the cause of liberty.

 

 

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